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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
someone's labor. and that is very alienating. this kind of consumerism, which destroys the environment, which creates circumstances of the devolution of living standards -- this is the result of the global surplus recycling, which is why this squeezing of the delights of the workers to keep prices low, but to keep the price is lower than germany or japan, to keep the capital coming here, to keep the german and japanese finance going. i don't believe in pointing fingers at anyone. we are all part of this system that we have created over the last few decades. which met its nemesis because of its hubris. >> i would like to ask three questions. one is to summarise, briefly, what did happen in greece? why did we slide further down in the world? number two, could you please summarize an alternative approach? what could, for example, the greek prime minister have done instead of what they did it? and third, there is an economic system from 1789 that created a great america before america became a global power -- of that help greece? >> i will answer your questions starting at the beginning. w
and if they bring it back they're getting whacked with tax code. we need friendly tax environment for corporations to spend the $1.2 trillion they're sitting on. gregg: if we go over the cliff that is not tax friendly. matt mccall, president of pns financial group. good to see you, matt. heather: we're seeing a bright spot in the u.s. economy. qord according to national association of realtors sales of new home were highest since april of 2010. a homebuyer tax credit caused then a spike in sales. it measures the number of americans who signed contracts to buy homes. the report also points to higher sales of previously occupied homes in the coming months. gregg: former president george h.w. bush remains in a houston hospital where he continues to recover from a persistent fever and a cough. a family spokesman just giving us some, a new details, an update on his condition. mike tobin is live outside methodist hospital with the latest. mike? >> reporter: the latest, gregg, the latest release we got included the phrase, continues to improve in relation to the former president's condition. the staff ar
a sudden they will be operating in truly hostile environments where they do not have the hearts and minds of the people themselves. the latest reports out of syria, though, show no progress on the diplomatic front. so far the one peace enjoy who has been able to meet with president bashar al-assad has walked away with every one of the meetings, including won't day saying we are at the same point we were before a civil war going on, and bashar al-assad saying he's not leaving and will continue to fight even if that means killing thousands of more of his own people. >> reporter: it seems to be so difficult was bashar al-assad continues to blame all of this on insurgents or terrorists if you will. >> reporter: i'm sorry, say again. we're having a problem with the signal. >> reporter: i apologize for that. the problem really lies in bashar al-assad's stand. he continues to blame awful his attacks on his own country coming from terrorism. >> reporter: well, he may have a point at some level in that sense, kelly. you have the rebels who are based there inside of syria, a number of them are hard
to create an environment that's friendly to business and capital so that businesses and capital come here, and then we'll have more in the future, and we can grow our consumption, and we can grow our well being. we can have 4% growth. but the reason why you need to read the book is that it makes sense, and we all need to become advocates for doing the sense bl thing. because the sensible thing is the last thing people in washington are talking about right now. [laughter] >> and i think there are four chapters in the book that sort of sum it up; president bush's forward, my introduction, brendan's chapter on why growth, and kevin's chapter, chapter 6, which presents three or or four, as he just outlined, quick ways to growth. maybe that's the best answer to your question. other questions? >> actually, could i just follow on that for a second? >> sure. >> one of the goals we have in this book is to change the conversation to growth. we have this debate between austerity and growth. growth really matters, okay? if you're growing, all right? to get the economy growing, people want to prosper,
unofficially. i come from an environment developed by the late senator who came to nebraska and fought for the legislature and officially was non-partisan. some people say he did it because he wanted to save money. the main reason he did it was to get rid of the conference committees that we go through back here. the work is a pile up on the football field. it changes hands five times before they blow the whistle. what we have in nebraska is officially nonpartisan and works. that is a backdrop for me. when i came here in a partisan environment, i said, i do not have to subscribe to a non partisan environment. my goal was one nebraska, not a republican or democratic or east or west. i represent all the people, even those who voted against me. i have taken that independent approach back here. i have to represent all of the people. >> did you ever contemplate becoming an independent? >> no, because the democratic party never pushed me out. i have been well excepted by the democrats in nebraska. ultimately, the democrats did not leave me, so why would i leave the democrats? >> there are so
women do quite well in those types of environments. technology helps both allowing people to handle different aspects of their lives but it can be a great environment to have a fulfilling career. >> you have worked with a very interesting, strong man. what is that like? any tips? >> larry summers, mark zuckerberg, at the white house. it's very interesting all these big guys want you to run their staff. how you handle them? -- how do you handle them? >> the common thread in a lot of the relationships with strong man is a kind of openness. by having that openness, you develop a real, trusting relationship. this is both with women and men, but i think one of the unique features of mark zuckerberg, he basically live the mission of the company, give people the power to connect and share to make the world more open, and he lives by that. he sits in the middle of our campus and his conference room is a glass box. >> does he come in every day? >> every day. he rarely travels. you cannot get him out with anyone else, but he is just sitting there living the mission. >> what is he doing? >> if
partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, b
on the environment for four years, but today, lisa jackson announced she's stepping down as administrator of the environmental protection agency. in a statement, jackson said, "i will leave the e.p.a. confident the ship is sailing in the right direction." jackson's tenure was defined in part by efforts to curb carbon emissions. in 2009, she formally declared greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, a threat to public health. that same day, she spoke on "the newshour." >> i join the president in calling for clean energy and climate legislation. and that's because i think having economy-wide legislation sends an unequivocal signal to the private sector that we really mean it, that we're moving towards green energy. >> brown: but a bill to cap greenhouse gases foundered in the democratic-controlled senate and never made it to the president's desk. jackson also pushed a rule to reduce smog, but it faced bitter opposition from republicans and industry over the cost and potential effect on jobs, and last year, president obama ordered it withdrawn. still, environmental groups praised jackson
the street and into treatment. we're not doing this in this country. >> has the environment changed, mr. lapierre? the supreme court has confirmed gun owner rights in this country, mayor bloomberg was on the program last week saying you tried to get the president not to be reelected, you failed in this effort. he says you don't have the clout that you had politicly in this town in past debates. >> the american people, i know one thing about them, they value their freedom. when the reality of the consequences of what the politicians in this town and the media and elites want to do to their rights and take them away, i think they'll do what they've done historically, defend the freedom. the american public knows the scene of the crime, it's a criminal and a victim. all these politicians and people like mayor bloomberg, new york city, if you're rich and you're famous, you get your permit, if you're a .300 hitter with the mets, you get a permit, a big developer, you get a permit, wall street executive, you get a permit, the mayor's buddy, you get your permit. if you're a guy in the bronx, most
to be for this year. that creates an environment of complete uncertainty. they have people rushing to buy gold, silver, in some of these other commodities. i think the star with term-limit thing politicians so that once they do get elected, they handle our business. you and i and everyone else, we have budgets. we have to balance our budget. fifth we cannot spend more than we take in. if we do we run into issues. i think the same principle should apply it to the country and wish to get the house in order before we start slipping into second world status and which are having issues with some of the other countries. host: here is say tweet -- here is a story in "the hill." trisha is on the line from indiana, a democrat. caller: i am very glad to talk to you. happy holidays to everybody. i just had a comment on the fiscal of debate and have a look to us in the future. i really think that the gentlemen, i think he was from virginia, had a good point about term limits. there are politicians of both sides that are making a life career out of being a politician instead of getting elected to serve the people
sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think
the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the american people. that said, we will see what the president has to propose. members on both sides will review it. then we will decide how best to proceed. hopefully, there's still time for an agreement of some kind
future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think of corporations
at the personality of the dog and how they would do in a home environment. when we are looking for adopters we look at will this dog be a good fit for your home? is this the dog you are looking for? we try to find a dog that matches your personality and what you are looking for in a companion animal as well. >> kristine, thank you for bringing these two guys in, finnigan and tickle. thank you guys for being well behaved and for not taking my face-off. i know you are a good guy. the first part of the charity is the red cross and it is a super corm sandy relief effort. they do a lot for our troops and they run a holiday cards for heros program that sends cards to our veterans and military families and troops overseas. here at america's news headquarters we collected cards from our on air personalities and made some new cards to send out. go to red cross .org to give to our troops. everything from phone cards to comfort kits this holiday season. >>> talks are stalled and the deadline is approaching with each passing day it looks more and more likely we could go over the edge of the fiscal cliff. what
was a generation ago. it was a very different political environment. i mean, as we saw last week, house republicans are not really inclined to compromise on their core principles, which are keeping taxes low and the second amendment. so i think eleanor's right. the only way you can maybe get something passed is to pair it with, you know, other options that they would agree to. they'd say, okay, we're going to get more, you know, mental health resources to prevent this from happening again. and okay maybe we'll agree to some limits on guns. you know, related to that, i would point out that the nra's latest proposal would cost $7 billion according to my back of the envelope calculations. >> you mean to put police officers in every school? >> yeah. you've got 100,000 public schools. right now you have about a third of them that have armed security guards of one kind or another. so that means you've got two-thirds, 70,000, costs about $100,000 to pay a salary and benefits for a police officer so, that comes out to $7 billion. to put that in perspective, the fbi's annual budget is $8 billion. now, i don
environment, that energy would burst forth. host: jkl tweets in, raising the top tax rate will not make a dent in the annual deficit. money gravitates to tax write-offs and crafted loopholes. guest: that is what you are seeing happening in europe when they are raising tax rates. lower the rates, get rid of these massive deductions, and you would see a cleaner code, a less corrupt code. host: valerie in new jersey on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. the more i listen to mr. forbes speak, i am reminded why the reasons why i have lately not been a consistent viewer of c-span anymore. they twist the truth. there is no integrity in what is said anymore. if you look at the record of spending -- mr. forbes mentioned mr. obama's spending being higher than the bush years. that is not true. the deficit which increases our debt grew so much under obama because he put both wars into the budget. george bush kept them out of the budget, was not paying for them, so things looked good. in the first few years of the obama administration, he created more jobs than george bush did in eight years. ge
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)